Posts Tagged 'Nostalgia'

Successful Sci-Fi has never shied away from nostalgia. In a genre where invention is one of its corner stones, the past is there to be plundered, but to also act as a grounding mechanism for explorations into the unique.

Take Star Trek, as a near perfect example. It’s employment of maritime history – plus a thread of nautical film drama – is there to ground its audience in something familiar while simultaneously challenging them. It’s interesting to note that series stepping too far from the show’s tried and tested formula, haven’t been as well received as those that have adhered. Which is probably why J J Abrams opted for a reboot of the original series, as opposed to the tabula rasa approach of Discovery. While it appears to be a series replete with references to the show’s universe, the presentation already seems to lack heritage, appearing overly shiny and jarringly polished. We’ll reserve judgement until it actually releases this autumn, though.

Look to the likes of Stranger Things and Guardians of the Galaxy and you’ll find that grounding force of nostalgia at work in both. One is a pure homage to a wealth of Sci-Fi and horror movies of the 1980’s – much in the same vein as J J Abrams’ 2011 film Super Eight. Meanwhile, the other has a central character entangled in a melancholic love of his childhood and dead mother, his treasured memories of the 1980s constantly battling with the miscomprehension of the aliens that surround him.

Then, within the multifarious realms of video games, you’ll still find the same mechanics at work. From the Film Noir influence and retro sound tracks of the BioShock and Fallout series, to the use of World War 2 as a launch pad for the likes of Wolfenstein and a host of other alternate histories.

In literature too, you can consider the whole swathe of Steampunk – from the early works of Michael Moorcock and the Oswald Bastable books through Neil Stephenson’s Diamond Age to Alan Moore’s League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and beyond – as another example of this tension between the familiar and the outlandish. It’s a balancing act and one that’s increasingly getting skewed for creatives trying to imagine futuristic settings while battling against the fact that Sci-Fi representations and technological reality are becoming increasingly convergent.

Perhaps then, looking backwards really is the way forward for the genre.

Tags: , , , ,