Posts Tagged 'global warming'

So are we completely screwed environmentally? With America, sorry The Donald, turning his back on the 2015 Paris climate accord there’s a fresh sense of doom about the future of our planet’s climate. Interestingly, it’s a sentiment echoed by James Lovelock, the originator of the Gia theory. In an interview with The Guardian at the tail end of 2016, he had revised his initial timeline for complete environmental disaster, but only because the predictions resulting from early computer modelling had proven wildly inaccurate. Always the provocateur, he’s now toying with the idea of a future ruled by autonomous robots, while retaining a happy-go-lucky approach to the chances of us ever changing our ways. He famously detected the hole in the ozone layer created by spent CFC emissions, but also put forward the idea of shipping all the remaining banned products off to Mars to bolster our neighbour’s atmosphere. However, as part of the recent BBC series of documentaries on colonising the red planet, Lovelock voiced the opinion that we really didn’t want to go there. Better to at least try and get our house in order. We’ll take the liberty then of passing on his apologies to Elon Musk and Stephen Hawkings, both advocates of increasing our chances of species survival by establishing off-world colonies.

Elsewhere, Musk has been increasing his personal carbon footprint with a level of rocket-based dexterity that continues to capture imaginations. Yes, the successful reuse of one of his Space X booster rockets released a ton of carbon dioxide, but we can forgive him. His dogged pursuit of technologies that will help humanity have to be taken into account. Not only was Tesla part of the vanguard of desirable electric cars, now joined by the Sci-Fi styled i-series from BMW, but Musk’s work in car battery technology has led to the Powerwall. The premise behind the device harks back to early differential tariffs like Economy 7 in which charging happens at low-cost, non-peak periods. Power can then be drawn during peak demand times within your household, thus driving energy usage and bills down.

Sticking with batteries, and older scientists for that matter, John Goodenough (94 to James Lovelock’s 97) has just had a breakthrough in relation to solid state batteries. He and his team have been working with glass electrolytes, of all things, and have recorded a tripling of battery longevity – something Mr Musk will no doubt be interested in.

While it’s heartening to see innovation and business get behind halting an ecostrophy, we have to be watchful that an impending sense of disaster doesn’t lead to inaction. It’s also sad to note that these innovations above are coming out of the USA, especially when the New Scientist is calling for ecological import taxes on The Donald’s homeland. On an individual level, a bit of basic research means it’s relatively easy to source your needs from companies outside of the US. Plus, there’s the daily consideration of diet, and the simple fact that beef and lamb production outstrips motor usage as generators of green house gasses. Seems that the old adage of think global, act local might still hold true.

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Science Fiction has taken on a whole new meaning with the inauguration of Donald Trump. Once again we’re in the realms of presidential confabulation matching the aspirations of Ronald Reagan when he took the ultimate ‘high ground’ with his doomed Star Wars initiative. This time, however, it’s not missile killing satellites, rather the fictions that Trump is spinning around global warming that need to have light shone upon them.

A Chinese hoax, the erosion of American jobs and tax dollars being fed into United Nation’s climate change programmes, just a “bullshit” [sic] theory… Trump’s general opposition is well recorded, in spite of such visual evidence as yet another massive chunk of the Antarctic ice shelf breaks free. What has changed now that he’s taken office, are his ploys and personnel appointments in order to help sell these fictions to the American people. Admittedly, this might all just be a tactic of his destabilising rhetoric, but it’s still disturbing to hear evidence of what’s already been put in place.

October 2016 saw him appoint climate change skeptic Myron Ebell to oversee the transitional efforts at the Environmental Protection Agency. In the meantime, the president’s belief in ‘clean coal’ – i.e. a process where all harmful emissions generated by energy production are completely neutralised – is pure Sci-Fi. The technology doesn’t currently exists and ongoing research projects have been plagued by delays and financial overspends. Then we have Trump’s claims that US wind farms are manufactured abroad and are lethal to local bird populations – both accusations countered in a recent Huffington Post story.

NASA plays a pivotal role in the data capture on climate change, and while Trump’s transitional team heading into that organisation aren’t as divisive as Myron Ebell, there is an indication that environmental data will be ‘revised’. Thankfully, as reported in Wired, a group of activists were already on the case nullifying such a revisionist approach by data mining numerous government pages.

So science and fiction merging in the most insidious manner, which could well add to an increasing despondency in any readership. But, as relayed in one of November’s posts, we’ve spent too long retreating into our virtual playgrounds. Thankfully, there are plenty of opportunities to channel our collective interests in the future into actions that may actually help shape it.

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