Archive for March, 2017

Seems like video games are finally getting the research they deserve. While we can still expect tabloid headlines bemoaning just how terrible this form of entertainment is for adults and children alike, articles are starting to emerge that explore just how gamers are affected by their pastime. We’ve know for years that games have had to accommodate the strange ways the soft machines of our brains are wired. There’s the ‘normal’ and ‘inverted’ settings on a controller’s joy stick, how some people get travel sick from playing in a first person perspective, and how those without stereoscopic vision are lost to the 3D and virtual reality experiences.

A few years ago a study discovered that patients in a burns ward required less pain relief medication when distracted while playing games on Sony’s PSP. This experiment was then replicated in 2016 by Professor Dale Edgar from Australia’s University of Notre Dame, this time using a Nintendo Wii, with similar results.

Now, in 2017, we’ve already seen a couple of stories about researchers getting in on the gaming kick. First up is a group of scientists from the University of Washington who have created a gaming app that rates anyone folding a series of proteins. High scoring runs of Foldit are then analysed by the research team in a marvelous adaptation of crowd sourcing. Also in March we discovered that the Karolinska Institute in Sweden had been utilising the shape matching game Tetris to help lessen the emotional impact of those suffering from post-traumatic stress. As with the Australian study, it seems that the specific distraction of matching shapes to spaces can be just as effective with emotional pain as other games can be for physical distress.

We now experience haptic systems in our phones every single day, so it doesn’t take a great leap of imagination to get to the full sensory feedback systems of Ernest Clein’s, Ready Player One. In this his protagonist, Wade Watts, transforms himself physically simply through the act of playing games while wearing a suit that generates a sensory image of the virtual world. A vision of the future? Keep an eye on the gamers, as they may well be the first to get there.

Tags: , , , ,

It’s always surprising that Star Wars can still surprise. Here we are 20 years after Episode IV hit the silver screens, and the franchise still has the power to keep fans on their toes.

Take the little know fact that the script for what is still considered the best of all the films in the series – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) – was co written by female sci-fi pulp writer Leigh Bracket. An interview with her was broadcast as part of the BBC’s documentary We Are the Martians: Seeing Is Believing this March. In this her personal literary influences were mapped out with Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E Howard pushed to the fore, plus she was a friend and associate of Ray Bradbury. Through her novel writing career she was engaged with Sci-Fi and, like her influencers, she focused on crafted story telling, high adventure and the red planet. Look to her screen writing accolades as well, and you’ll discover the film noir classic The Big Sleep (1946) and western classic Rio Bravo (1959) – both of which fed into the smart plotting and smarter dialogue of Empire. Which makes her being eclipsed by a host of other, lesser writers, all the more baffling.

The death of Carrie Fisher at the end of 2016 was one of the worst surprises of what we can magnanimously call an ‘eventful’ year. Thankfully, we still get to see her final performance. Scinecefiction.com has confirmed that The Last Jedi will remain unchanged despite the fact that the actress won’t return for the third installment. It’s a great mark of respect for Fisher and, as with Leonard Nimoy and John Hurt, there’s no doubt her Sci-Fi legacy will continue on to the next generation of fans.

Finally, in this triptych of Star Wars curiosities, Wired has released a behind-the-scenes peek into the workings of Rogue One (2016) director Gareth Edwards. What’s surprising in this five minute mini documentary isn’t the fact that Edwards manages to sneak in a cameo role, but rather that Darth Vader’s iconic scene wasn’t even filmed until the cutting room edit. Just goes to show that sometimes last minute pivots can still create something outstanding.

Tags: , , , , , ,

There’s a wider cyberpunk theme resonating through the first of this month’s posts, triggered predominantly by one of the sub-genre’s originators, Bruce Sterling. Presenting yet another provocative keynote speech at this year’s SXSW festival, his focus – among myriad topics – was on the social exclusions a post-work society would produce. Putting forward a world in which robotic labour makes humans redundant, he then went on to consider the rise of a patriarchal, techno aristocracy and the resentment that such a ruling class would generate among a breadth of minorities. He also argued that we should forego our egotistic narratives about being dominated by machines, get to grips with global warming and take charge of the legacy we’re leaving to our children – all great topics to dig into another day. For now, though, this notion of exclusion within the realms of modern cyberpunk is already generating traction.

Originally the core novels that presented the internet as a virtual space that could be experienced were replete with marginalised voices. Assassins disguised as Japanese tourists, Rastafarians commandeering space habitats, female protagonists with eye glasses continually connected to the web, an indigenous Alaskan islander on a revenge mission against America because his father had survived being nuked by the USA not once, but twice…

Japan, although approaching this burgeoning digital world from a very different set of cultural sensibilities, still led the way for female protagonists during the 1990s. Chief among these was Mamoru Oshii’s Anime Ghost in the Shell (1995). Jump forward 27 years and we encounter a round of controversy centering on the Hollywood re-imaging of this iconic film, and the casting of Scarlett Johansson as Major Motoko Kusanagi. Some native Asian fans have put time and effort into complaining about this cultural “white-washing”, news channels within fandom have investigated rumours of post-effects ethnicity, while the original studio thinks that the lead actress is “well cast”. There’s also an argument that this will bring Masamune Shirow’s original Manga to a wider audience, plus it’s another Hollywood film with a woman – albeit a sexualised cybernetic woman – at the centre of the action. However, the need to erode narratives that perpetuate an inaccurate view of our current society remains – especially within the non-conformist genre of Sci-Fi.

Look briefly to games like Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (2016) and the upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 and we still find sexualised women and white male protagonists sustaining Hollywood stereotypes. Return to film, and we have the imminent Ready Player One and Blade Runner 2049. Both fall under the umbrella of cyberpunk, and both feature white male leads. It’s a far cry from the diversity that Bruce Sterling, William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and their compatriots originally imagined. At least Bruce has promised that his next project will be a book based upon his adopted homeland of Italy. Let’s hope he continues his good work pushing boundaries, and those trying to sanitize the sub-genre take note.

Tags: , , , ,